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We are continuing to think about tenses today. Again, the tasks have been split into green and purple. Choose one task to complete.

 

Green task

The paragraph below has been written in a strange mixture of tenses and so it just doesn’t make sense. Copy out the paragraph, only changing some verbs so it is all in the simple present tense. Every time you change a verb, underline it to help you mark afterwards.  

Purple task

 

The paragraph below has been written in a strange mixture of tenses and so it just doesn’t make sense. You need to copy it out again, using a range of present tenses. The tenses grid linked below will help as a reminder if you need it.

 

When you reach a black underlined word, change it to the present simple tense.

When you reach a blue underlined word, change it to the present perfect tense.

When you reach a red underlined word, change it to the present progressive tense.

LI: I can use personification in poetry

 

Well done everyone for completing your hot tasks. Your portal stories were excellent.

 

For the next two lessons, I want us to think about poetry and today we will look at figurative language. This means using different words to describe. Examples of figurative language are personification, similes and metaphors.

 

We will focus on personification (but feel free to add any others in if you wish!).

 

Read the poem below and consider what natural disaster has been personified here. (Personification is a way to describe a non-living thing as human – if you can’t quite remember how to use it, see the link below).

In this poem, the volcano is described as a man who wakes up in quite a bad mood!

 

Today, I would like you to write your own personification poem. You may choose one of the natural disasters below to write about.

 

Your poem can have as many verses as you wish and each verse may have as many lines as you wish. It is about quality, not quantity.

 

Describe the movement of your natural disaster through personification in your poem, turning the natural disaster into a he or a she just like in the poem above.

 

Choose from the following natural disasters:

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